Tag Archives: Dental Bonding

Another Cosmetic Dentist Horror Story

I don’t know what to do. I had a chipped tooth on my front teeth which had been fixed with bonding. I’d since moved and the bonding needed to be repaired. My new dentist said veneers were a more longterm solution. I agreed, but when he went to do them he noticed I had fillings and said they couldn’t be done. Instead, he suggested I get crowns. I’ve always been of the opinion the professional knows best, but now I’m doubting myself. The crowns looked fine when he showed them to me, but on my teeth they are grayish in color and I haven’t smiled since I received them. Do you have any helpful suggestions? What went wrong?

Lara

Dear Lara,

photo of a chipped front tooth
Fixing a chipped tooth should be a no-brainer for a good cosmetic dentist

I’m so sorry this has happened to you. In fact, I’m guessing your smile looks worse now than before. The only thing that went wrong is you trusted in an incompetent cosmetic dentist you shouldn’t have. I know it’s natural to trust your medical professional. In no way am I blaming you. It sounds like your dentist is trying to dabble in cosmetic dentistry but doesn’t yet have either the knowledge or the skill.

Cosmetic Dental Mistake Number One

The standard repair for a chipped tooth is dental bonding, so your previous dentist was right about that. Suggesting a porcelain veneer would normally be considered a massive overtreatment. There was one thing your new dentist said correctly. The veneers do last longer than bonding, but they’re much more expensive.

Porcelain veneers are used to do total smile makeovers. They’re an incredible procedure and can completely transform a smile in the hands of a skilled cosmetic dentist. But, it’s a huge expense for a simple chipped tooth. Either he doesn’t know how to do dental bonding or he was just trying to squeeze more money out of you.

Cosmetic Dental Mistake Number Two

Having fillings would not have kept you from getting porcelain veneers. The bonding would have worked just fine. This leads me to believe your dentist doesn’t understand the basics about his field.

Cosmetic Dental Mistake Number Three

He didn’t do a try-in of your porcelain crowns. How they look on your teeth is completely different than how they look before they’re bonded. The part of your natural tooth structure that is left effects the coloring. That’s why experienced cosmetic dentists will use a temporary try-in paste so you can see them and give approval of the true appearance before permanent bonding.

Where Do You Go From Here?

In your place, I’d ask for a refund and go to a skilled cosmetic dentist to have this case re-done. He lied to you about the fillings and did a poor job on the crowns. Unfortunately, because dental crowns require a severe grinding down of your natural teeth, you’re stuck with them. You’ll have to have crowns made again. The good news is, in the hands of an artistic dentist, you can have a gorgeous smile once more.

To find that dentist, look on the mynewsmile.com website. They recommend expert cosmetic dentists by area.

This blog is brought to you by Newton, MA Cosmetic Dentist Dr. Steve Bader.

Disappointed Dentist Said No to Porcelain Veneers

I wanted to get porcelain veneers. I’ve got several chipped teeth and ugly stains. I asked my dentist to give me porcelain veneers to fix them, but he said no. When I asked him why he said because as the dentist he’d know what would work and what wouldn’t. He did say he was willing to whiten my teeth but thinks veneers would be a mistake. I think I’d be okay with his decision if he would just tell me why. What am I missing?

Caryn

Dear Caryn,

A dental tool holding up a porcelain veneer

I think the biggest thing you’re missing is a dentist who understands cosmetic dentistry. Yours obviously doesn’t and rather than admit that he tries to lord over you with the “I’m the doc and you’re not” comment. That’s a complete cop-out and unfair to you. If he’s going to tell you no, he owes it to you to tell you why.

My guess is (and this is truly just a guess) is that he doesn’t know how to do the procedure. He also didn’t suggest any alternatives for you outside of giving you teeth whitening. What about the chips on your teeth?

What if You’re Not a Porcelain Veneers Candidate?

The first thing I’m going to suggest to you is to get a second opinion. Porcelain veneers are a great procedure for the two issues you’ve described. They can give your teeth a brilliant white color while repairing the chips at the same time. In fact, they can even change the shape of your teeth if you’re interested in that. Because of that, I’d like you to find out if there truly is a reason for you not to get them.

If for some reason you are not a good candidate, all is not lost. There are options. First, go ahead with the teeth whitening. Next, for the chipped teeth. Dental bonding can fix chips very well. The reason you want to do the whitening first is so your dentist can match the bonding to the new color of your teeth. The bonding won’t whiten after it’s placed on your teeth.

Who Should Place Your Porcelain Veneers?

Let’s assume for the moment that you are a good candidate. Your dentist likely did you a favor by not agreeing to do your procedure. You wouldn’t have gotten a beautiful smile. What you need is an expert cosmetic dentist. To find one in your area, I’d check the mynewsmile.com website. They only recommend artistic, skilled cosmetic dentists. Make sure they have some form of beautiful smile guarantee.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Steve Bader.

My Porcelain Veneer is Crooked

I’m so overwhelmed with how ridiculous I look right now that I don’t know what to do. I had a small chip on a front tooth which became damaged and fell off. I’ve moved to another city so I had to go to another dentist. She told me that dental bonding can’t be re-done and I’d need to get a crown. I didn’t want to get a crown put on a healthy tooth for just a small chip. We compromised on a porcelain veneer. When she showed it to me, it looked fine. Then she bonded it on. They sort of rushed me out of the office after that, so I didn’t get a second look at it. On the drive home, it felt weird with my tongue. I could feel a gap between the porcelain veneer and my natural tooth. That worried me so the moment I made it home I rushed to the bathroom mirror. My veneer was bonded on crooked. I called the office, but they insist it looks fine and I gave approval when they placed it. Plus, they say once something is permanently bonded, nothing can be done. I can’t go about looking like this. What are your recommendations?

Audrey B. – Ohio

Audrey,

There are some major warning bells going off in my head about this case.  First, let me say you were right not to get the dental crown. Wasting healthy tooth structure is never a good idea. Unless there’s something you’ve not mentioned, there isn’t any reason dental bonding couldn’t be re-done. My guess is your new dentist doesn’t know how to do dental bonding, but she didn’t want to admit it.

I’m guessing she probably wasn’t thrilled about doing a porcelain veneer either, but didn’t want to make it look like she couldn’t do it. It sounds like they couldn’t get the bonding quite right and rushed you out the door.

It’s possible they could make some minor adjustments, but based on what you’ve described it will take much more than some minor adjustments. The porcelain veneer needs to be re-done. You might be better off getting a refund and have another, more experienced cosmetic dentist take over the case.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Steve Bader.

 

Can Tooth Bands Replace Porcelain Veneers?

I’ve been talking to my dentist about the gap between my front teeth. He suggested braces, but I felt that would be unsightly and time consuming. He then said my best option was to get porcelain veneers. He showed them to me and what he’d done for a couple of patients. I was really excited about them, until I saw the price. I don’t think I can pay that much. I recently saw an add for tooth bands. They’re only like $30 and they say they can close gaps in teeth.  Is that a good option?

Franny L. – Ohio

Franny,

I’m really glad you’ve written. These tooth bands are a gimmick and can cause you to do enough damage to your teeth that you could loose them. They’re basically just rubber bands, so charging you $30 for a set of them isn’t really a good deal.

However, I don’t agree with your dentist’s recommendations either. Porcelain veneers are an expensive over-treatment, if the only thing you wanted repaired was your tooth gap. It’s designed for people who want to completely change their smile. They can change the shape, size, and  color of your teeth, giving you a completely new smile.

The common treatment, with patients who don’t want to straighten their teeth, is to use dental bonding. It uses a composite resin and will close the gap. It’s much more affordable than porcelain veneers.

If the main thing you’re concerned about with braces is the unsightliness, then I’d suggest Invisalign as an option. They’re completely invisible. No one will know you’re wearing them, and they’ll straighten your teeth in half the time.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Steve Bader.

Will Lumineers make my teeth longer in appearance?

I have a question about the appearance of my teeth. I have been told that my teeth are pretty straight and have just discolored a bit as I’ve gotten older. My cosmetic dentist that I am consulting with recommended I try Lumineers because I want my teeth to look larger and whiter. I have moved forward with the process and the impressions have been sent over to the laboratory. The lab person told my dentist that the color could be corrected but they couldn’t do anything about my desire to make them look longer. The brochure states otherwise and my dentist is supposed to be following up. From the marketing of the company it sure looks like they can be longer and bigger? Any advice? After my frustrations, the dentist is now telling me that he may want to bond the teeth instead of Lumineers. Does this sound normal?

– Danielle in Florida

Danielle,

You should proceed with caution. From the sounds of it, it is a strong possibility that your cosmetic dentist may not be experienced or artistically inclined in the aesthetics that are required to do beautiful cosmetic dentistry work.

It sure sounds like the laboratory is telling your dentist what should happen, when the dentist truly is the one that should be directed the lab. It is absolutely the dentist’s responsibility to provide instructions as to the exact size, shape, and appearance of porcelain veneers.  It may be in your best interest to seek a second opinion from an experienced cosmetic dentist.

Lumineers are simply a particular brand of porcelain veneers. And a true cosmetic dentist will be able to create beauty and recommend the right brand for your specific case. That said, it is difficult to make any other specific recommendations based on the little information you have provided. But as far as moving forward with Lumineers or even the dental bonding that your current dentist is considering, you need to seek another opinion before committing to anything further. Cosmetic dentistry can be very expensive and you deserve to have a smile that you will absolutely fall in love with.

The good news is that you haven’t proceeded to far into the smile design process as of yet. Good luck to you!

Remember, not just any dentist can do this kind of highly artistic work well, even if they tell you otherwise. Ask for references and a portfolio of similar cases.

This post is sponsored by Newton MA cosmetic dentist Ultimate Aesthetics.

How do you know if a dentist uses mercury or not?

Are there any specific standards or organizations that can assist one in finding a holistic dentist? I don’t want dangerous ingredients placed in my mouth and from what I can tell all amalgam fillings have mercury in them. Do most dentists still use amalgams? How do I find one that doesn’t?

– Paul in Rhode Island

Paul,

Every amalgam filling does contain mercury. But the simplest way to find a mercury-free dentist is to simply ask. Many dentists build their practices around holistic dentistry techniques. In fact, even if you don’t realize it, it may be hard to find dentists that still use amalgam fillings. Let us just state for the record that the American Dental Association still deems amalgam (silver) fillings to be completely safe. So this is a dentist’s discretion that leads them to the services and materials provided in individual practices.

Although, it is very understandable that patients are concerned with having mercury placed in their mouth. White fillings are actually bonded to the tooth and offer many benefits over amalgam. They actually strengthen the tooth structure, require less drilling of the natural tooth structure away, have less post-operative sensitivity, and they look much nicer too. In fact, you won’t even be able to see where the natural tooth ends and the filling material begins.

There are some “old school” dentists that hold on to the “tried and true” ways of dentistry. But when you start researching this topic, you will find that the majority of dentists have embraced the new advances in bonding and offer white composite for patients.

Hopefully this information was helpful to you!

This post is sponsored by Newton MA cosmetic dentist Ultimate Aesthetics.

Bonding and Whitening

I’m finally going to be able to get a chip on my front tooth repaired. I’ve been saving up for this all year. I’ve been toying with the idea of getting my teeth whitened in a few months also, but wondered how it would affect the bonding I’m getting done on my front tooth. Will whitening damage bonding?

Kevin- Baltimore

Kevin,

Teeth Whitening will not affect your bonding at all, and that includes actually whitening it. Whatever color your bonding is when it is placed on your tooth, that is the whitest it will ever be. Therefore, my recommendation would be to have your teeth whitened first  to the whitening level you desire, and then have your dental bonding done to match it.

This blog is brought to you by Mercury-free dentist Dr. Steve Bader.