Tag Archives: Dental Bonding

My Porcelain Veneer is Crooked

I’m so overwhelmed with how ridiculous I look right now that I don’t know what to do. I had a small chip on a front tooth which became damaged and fell off. I’ve moved to another city so I had to go to another dentist. She told me that dental bonding can’t be re-done and I’d need to get a crown. I didn’t want to get a crown put on a healthy tooth for just a small chip. We compromised on a porcelain veneer. When she showed it to me, it looked fine. Then she bonded it on. They sort of rushed me out of the office after that, so I didn’t get a second look at it. On the drive home, it felt weird with my tongue. I could feel a gap between the porcelain veneer and my natural tooth. That worried me so the moment I made it home I rushed to the bathroom mirror. My veneer was bonded on crooked. I called the office, but they insist it looks fine and I gave approval when they placed it. Plus, they say once something is permanently bonded, nothing can be done. I can’t go about looking like this. What are your recommendations?

Audrey B. – Ohio

Audrey,

There are some major warning bells going off in my head about this case.  First, let me say you were right not to get the dental crown. Wasting healthy tooth structure is never a good idea. Unless there’s something you’ve not mentioned, there isn’t any reason dental bonding couldn’t be re-done. My guess is your new dentist doesn’t know how to do dental bonding, but she didn’t want to admit it.

I’m guessing she probably wasn’t thrilled about doing a porcelain veneer either, but didn’t want to make it look like she couldn’t do it. It sounds like they couldn’t get the bonding quite right and rushed you out the door.

It’s possible they could make some minor adjustments, but based on what you’ve described it will take much more than some minor adjustments. The porcelain veneer needs to be re-done. You might be better off getting a refund and have another, more experienced cosmetic dentist take over the case.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Steve Bader.

 

Can Tooth Bands Replace Porcelain Veneers?

I’ve been talking to my dentist about the gap between my front teeth. He suggested braces, but I felt that would be unsightly and time consuming. He then said my best option was to get porcelain veneers. He showed them to me and what he’d done for a couple of patients. I was really excited about them, until I saw the price. I don’t think I can pay that much. I recently saw an add for tooth bands. They’re only like $30 and they say they can close gaps in teeth.  Is that a good option?

Franny L. – Ohio

Franny,

I’m really glad you’ve written. These tooth bands are a gimmick and can cause you to do enough damage to your teeth that you could loose them. They’re basically just rubber bands, so charging you $30 for a set of them isn’t really a good deal.

However, I don’t agree with your dentist’s recommendations either. Porcelain veneers are an expensive over-treatment, if the only thing you wanted repaired was your tooth gap. It’s designed for people who want to completely change their smile. They can change the shape, size, and  color of your teeth, giving you a completely new smile.

The common treatment, with patients who don’t want to straighten their teeth, is to use dental bonding. It uses a composite resin and will close the gap. It’s much more affordable than porcelain veneers.

If the main thing you’re concerned about with braces is the unsightliness, then I’d suggest Invisalign as an option. They’re completely invisible. No one will know you’re wearing them, and they’ll straighten your teeth in half the time.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Steve Bader.

Will Lumineers make my teeth longer in appearance?

I have a question about the appearance of my teeth. I have been told that my teeth are pretty straight and have just discolored a bit as I’ve gotten older. My cosmetic dentist that I am consulting with recommended I try Lumineers because I want my teeth to look larger and whiter. I have moved forward with the process and the impressions have been sent over to the laboratory. The lab person told my dentist that the color could be corrected but they couldn’t do anything about my desire to make them look longer. The brochure states otherwise and my dentist is supposed to be following up. From the marketing of the company it sure looks like they can be longer and bigger? Any advice? After my frustrations, the dentist is now telling me that he may want to bond the teeth instead of Lumineers. Does this sound normal?

– Danielle in Florida

Danielle,

You should proceed with caution. From the sounds of it, it is a strong possibility that your cosmetic dentist may not be experienced or artistically inclined in the aesthetics that are required to do beautiful cosmetic dentistry work.

It sure sounds like the laboratory is telling your dentist what should happen, when the dentist truly is the one that should be directed the lab. It is absolutely the dentist’s responsibility to provide instructions as to the exact size, shape, and appearance of porcelain veneers.  It may be in your best interest to seek a second opinion from an experienced cosmetic dentist.

Lumineers are simply a particular brand of porcelain veneers. And a true cosmetic dentist will be able to create beauty and recommend the right brand for your specific case. That said, it is difficult to make any other specific recommendations based on the little information you have provided. But as far as moving forward with Lumineers or even the dental bonding that your current dentist is considering, you need to seek another opinion before committing to anything further. Cosmetic dentistry can be very expensive and you deserve to have a smile that you will absolutely fall in love with.

The good news is that you haven’t proceeded to far into the smile design process as of yet. Good luck to you!

Remember, not just any dentist can do this kind of highly artistic work well, even if they tell you otherwise. Ask for references and a portfolio of similar cases.

This post is sponsored by Newton MA cosmetic dentist Ultimate Aesthetics.

How do you know if a dentist uses mercury or not?

Are there any specific standards or organizations that can assist one in finding a holistic dentist? I don’t want dangerous ingredients placed in my mouth and from what I can tell all amalgam fillings have mercury in them. Do most dentists still use amalgams? How do I find one that doesn’t?

– Paul in Rhode Island

Paul,

Every amalgam filling does contain mercury. But the simplest way to find a mercury-free dentist is to simply ask. Many dentists build their practices around holistic dentistry techniques. In fact, even if you don’t realize it, it may be hard to find dentists that still use amalgam fillings. Let us just state for the record that the American Dental Association still deems amalgam (silver) fillings to be completely safe. So this is a dentist’s discretion that leads them to the services and materials provided in individual practices.

Although, it is very understandable that patients are concerned with having mercury placed in their mouth. White fillings are actually bonded to the tooth and offer many benefits over amalgam. They actually strengthen the tooth structure, require less drilling of the natural tooth structure away, have less post-operative sensitivity, and they look much nicer too. In fact, you won’t even be able to see where the natural tooth ends and the filling material begins.

There are some “old school” dentists that hold on to the “tried and true” ways of dentistry. But when you start researching this topic, you will find that the majority of dentists have embraced the new advances in bonding and offer white composite for patients.

Hopefully this information was helpful to you!

This post is sponsored by Newton MA cosmetic dentist Ultimate Aesthetics.

Bonding and Whitening

I’m finally going to be able to get a chip on my front tooth repaired. I’ve been saving up for this all year. I’ve been toying with the idea of getting my teeth whitened in a few months also, but wondered how it would affect the bonding I’m getting done on my front tooth. Will whitening damage bonding?

Kevin- Baltimore

Kevin,

Teeth Whitening will not affect your bonding at all, and that includes actually whitening it. Whatever color your bonding is when it is placed on your tooth, that is the whitest it will ever be. Therefore, my recommendation would be to have your teeth whitened first  to the whitening level you desire, and then have your dental bonding done to match it.

This blog is brought to you by Mercury-free dentist Dr. Steve Bader.